WarmUp with Michael Hurley

In this episode, I chat with Michael Hurley, cofounder and CEO of WarmUp. You can learn more about WarmUp here: http://sendwarmup.com/

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In this episode, I chat with Mike Hurley, the co-founder and CEO of WarmUp. WarmUp is an app that helps sales teams drive and track sales referral revenue and help generate warm leads for sales teams. He has been in sales for over 10 years and software for over six years. During his time in sales, he found that sales reps often don’t ask for referrals, or do so haphazardly, which lead him to create this app.

Research has shown that customer referrals and employee referrals have the highest conversion rate of any lead source, however, he found that many companies weren’t using this source, or weren’t doing it well. We discuss the importance of referrals as a lead source and how referrals can be forecasted and relied upon by a company to create another predictable stream of revenue. Mike shares examples of ways in which referrals may not be used to the fullest extent, and also, what makes WarmUp different from other email marketing platforms.

Finally, Mike details how the app is used, and he gives insight to the current status of the business, strategies to obtain customers, and what the company looks like 12-24 months in the future.

Topics In This Episode:

  • Importance of referrals as a predictable source of revenue

  • How customers use WarmUp as a tool

  • Current status and the future of the company

  • Tips on converting referrals and how to ask for a referral at the end of the sales process

  • The difference between WarmUp and other email campaign platforms

  • Strategies for obtaining new customers

To get in touch with Mike:

Full Transcript

Mike Kelly:                         
Welcome to the Startup Competitors podcast. Today, we have Mike Hurley, co founder and CEO of WarmUp. Mike, welcome to the show.

Michael Hurley:               
Thanks, Mike. It's good to be here.

Mike Kelly:                         
All right, man. Let's start with WarmUp pitch.

Michael Hurley:               
All right. WarmUp is an app that helps sales team drive and track referral revenue. We help generate warm leads for sales teams. So would you like me to kind of talk about where the idea came from?

Mike Kelly:                         
Yes, let's start there, and then also try to hit on the other side of where the idea came from. Talk a little bit about the actual user experience if I'm a salesperson. What am I doing when I'm interacting with your software?

Michael Hurley:               
Okay, cool. So I'll go ahead and kind of start where the idea came from really quick. That'll give you some context. So I'd been in sales for a little over 10 years, been in software for a little over six. What I found in my career is that sales reps often don't ask for referrals. So if they do that thing at all, they're kind of doing it ad hawk and haphazard at best. Oftentimes, they're not really sure how and when to ask for referrals. And so I went out there and I started talking to a lot of sales reps. We kind of affirmed that belief was true. And then we started talking to their sales managers, and what we found is that sales managers wanted their teams to be asking for referrals. But it was more or less just a soap box speech. They weren't really sure how many referrals were being asked for, and then how many referrals were actually being received.

Michael Hurley:               
So that was kind of the genesis for the idea of the product is can we develop a piece of software that gives sales managers visibility into how often their team is asking for referrals and how many referrals are getting received, and then that visibility and that platform can help drive and track that referral revenue. And really what it was about at an organization level is we wanted to help term referral ask into a type of outbound activity that was similar to emails and calls. Something that could be forecasted and relied upon by the company to create another predictable stream of revenue.

Michael Hurley:               
So that's kind of the genesis of the idea. If we want to go ahead and transition into kind of how sales reps use it. That was the next thing you wanted to talk about, right?

Mike Kelly:                         
That'd be great.

Michael Hurley:               
Cool. So when I thought about how I asked for referrals, what I thought about was typically I would email somebody like yourself, right? And I would say, "Hey, Mike. How's it going? I was wondering if you might be open to making a referral for me." And then I would provide some additional context. If you were an existing customer, I might say, "Hey, really appreciate you having been a customer the last year. It seems like you've gotten a lot of value out of the product. Is this something you might be open to doing for me? Making a referral for me." And so that was my normal process, and I started think about how could we maybe build that into a piece of software to essentially give a sales rep an out of the box process that would be easy for them to understand how and when to ask for referrals, specifically this is the how part.

Michael Hurley:               
So a sales rep will login to our software today. They typically will load in their customer list or will pull it in from Salesforce, and then what we make it easy for them to do is simply ask for referrals. So either they will send out one off emails one at a time or they will execute a email campaign through the software, and all of those emails that are going out are essentially asking, "Hey. Would you be open to making a referral for me?"

Michael Hurley:               
So today, the way that people respond to that is either they just respond like you normally do in an email, or there's a yes button that they'll click in that email. If they click the yes button, WarmUp will actually automatically send them a referral template that they can then use to make a referral for you. This is a bit hard to explain over a podcast, but essentially at that point your existing customer or this person that you're asking for a referral, they have this template they can click on. There's a button in that email that they can click on, and it loads a fully pre written email that they can then send to somebody in their network.

Michael Hurley:               
What we're doing on the backend at that point is were tracking that your sales rep has asked for referrals and how many times. We're tracking any referrals that they get. If you were to followup and make a referral for me, it's going to create an opportunity or a new contact or a lead in Salesforce. That's the CRM we integrate with today. The idea here is that we're trying to track the entire lifecycle of a referral for the sales rep. So I'll go ahead and stop there for a second. I just threw a lot at you. Do you have any questions about that?

Mike Kelly:                         
It's great. Yeah. Super specific. I love that. Give me a feeling for current status to business. How big are you guys? How many employees? How many customers? Revenue, fundraising, anything you want to share or can share to help somebody who's listening understand where you guys are.

Michael Hurley:               
Yeah, sure. So team wise, we're a pretty small team. We have a few people working in the business, an engineer, myself. I'm really handling customer onboarding and support and sales. We have a part time product manager and then we have one full time software engineer that's working in the business currently. So that's the team. It's a good team. Kind of cover the different areas that you need to cover to get a software product company off the ground.

Michael Hurley:               
And customer wise, we have 19 customers today, and we have right around $24,000 in ARR. So right around $2000 a month reoccurring coming in. We're very proud of that revenue and that customer base. There's a wide range of customers. Some of them are very large. So we recently signed a contract with a company that every new week that have 900 new customers, and they're using ... They're going to be using WarmUp to be asking those 900 new customers for referrals. And so we're really excited about that.

Michael Hurley:               
And then we have a number of customers that it's just a one to two person team. They're using the platform to ask for referrals every time they close a new deal and to ask for referrals on a quarterly basis when they check in with them. Those are two very different use cases. They're both totally valid opportunities to ask for referrals.

Michael Hurley:               
So that's kind of where we're at customer wise, revenue wise, and team wise. It's a really interesting time in the business because we're still kind of exploring which use cases garner the best adoption, which use cases make our customers the most happy, and that's even more complicated by the fact that with referrals, referrals are nuanced by industry. For example, in sports and entertainment, we have a minor league baseball team that we're working with, and their customers are ready and willing and very happy to make referrals and they get a lot of referrals from our system because people love to tell their friends and family that they have a guy or a gal that is their ticket sales professional. And they like to make referrals for that person. I think for a number of reasons, right? You want your friends and family to go to a baseball game with you. It's an easy referral to make. Most people love going to baseball games, right? And so helping the ticket sales reps at that organization ask for referrals is ...

Mike Kelly:                         
Pretty low baring in entry.

Michael Hurley:               
Yeah. Exactly.

Mike Kelly:                         
Versus, "You should buy some life insurance."

Michael Hurley:               
Right. Life insurance is a little bit more tricky, definitely. There's a stigma associated with it. So that's a good contrast.

Mike Kelly:                         
Talk to me a little bit about that dichotomy between the larger company that's getting 900 new customers a week versus the smaller company that is one or two people and presumably only getting a couple new referrals each week. So because in my mind, that's a pretty big dichotomy when it comes to thinking through that enterprise sale versus the smaller boutique sale and the features you would create and what customer support looks like and what innovation looks like and all that kind of stuff. At what point do you think ... Just wondering your thoughts, at what point do you think you have to make a choice and which of those you going to go after. Do you think you even have to make that choice? Do you think you can support them both? How are you guys thinking through that right now?

Michael Hurley:               
Yeah. So I tend to think about it a lot from an adoption standpoint. I'm actually going to introduce kind of a third alternative into this line of thinking. So you have ... So, frankly, the companies that have one to two users and they're asking for referrals on like a kind of one to two users and they're asking for referrals on an ad hawk basis. Those adoptions a lot tougher because they're just fewer opportunities to ask for referrals when you only have one to two users. There's less value being generated overall over the course of the year. That's a much tougher use case. I kind of see that use case maybe going away over time to be totally honest.

Michael Hurley:               
I'm going to share with you a use case that we just recently kind of started to pilot and explore, and that's the use case where you have an entire sales team of let's say five to 10 account executives, and they are each account exec or each sales rep is winning and losing between 10 to 20 deals a month. So they might win five deals and they might lose 15. That's pretty normal if you're in a high sales environment, right? You've got a lot of deals in the pipeline.

Michael Hurley:               
So one version of our service is we integrate with Salesforce, we integrate with their CRM, and Salesforce usually tells us when they won a deal or lost a deal. And then what we're doing is we're prompted them via email, "Hey. We saw you just closed out a deal. It's time to ask for a referral." And so there's a button in that email that goes to the sales rep, and it says, "Hey. Do you want to ask them for a referral?" And if they click the button, it will automatically send out a referral ask on their behalf based on a template that they've set up inside WarmUp. That use case, they don't have to ... The sales rep doesn't have to login to actually execute that referral ask, and then everything kind of happens behind the scenes without them having to login to any software.

Michael Hurley:               
Because at the end of the day, what we're really trying to do is help organization and sales teams and sales rep form a habit of doing something new that they were not doing previously. So if you want somebody to form a habit, you have to understand what the queue is, right? The queue is you just closed a deal, whether you won a deal or lost it. And then the routine is I get this email from WarmUp prompting me, reminding me that I need to do this thing, and I click the button if I want to send out the referral ask, and then everything kind of happens from there. And then the reward is around 20% of the time, I get an email instructional referral that pops into my inbox, and that reward creates a craving that then drives the habit loop over and over again.

Michael Hurley:               
And the reason why I really like that use case is that if you've got a team of at least 10 sales reps and they're each asking for 10 referrals every month, because there's at least 10 opportunities to do that thing, now you've got 100 referral asks that happen every month. And over the course of the year, that's 1200 referral ask. And what we've seen on the platform is a referral rate of 20% on average. It's actually closer to 22%. But 20% gives us a nice round number to think about here. So if you have 1200 referral asks that go out, 20% is 240. 240 referrals that have now just been generated. And if you're a sales manager or a VP of sales, you know your conversion rates, and so if you get 240 referrals that have been added to your pipeline, you know that a certain percentage of those become meetings, certain percentage of those will become demos, and then new customers.

Mike Kelly:                         
Do you have a feel for how much more valuable a referral client is versus a non-referral client? So in that smaller funnel, are they were more likely to close, less likely to close? Do you have any data on that yet?

Michael Hurley:               
The research that we've been able to find out there is that it has the highest conversion rate of any lead source. There is ... I've got it right here actually. I was looking at it this morning, but there's ... Maybe we can share it in the comments or something like that for the podcast. But there's a really great article where a form looked at the data, the lead data, the conversion data for ... I forget the number of companies they looked at, but they looked at what was the conversion rates across all the different lead sources for these 50 companies. And what they found is that customer referrals and employee referrals have the highest conversion rate of any lead source. I think it was around 68%.

Michael Hurley:               
So what that ends up meaning is that cost of ... If you spent more time focusing on referrals, if you had a process to drive referral revenue and drive more referrals in your pipeline, you could in theory decrease your cost of customer acquisition. We've had a number of customers actually where that's been the case.

Mike Kelly:                         
So now I'm going to ask you a psychology question.

Michael Hurley:               
Get into my head a little bit.

Mike Kelly:                         
So I'm a sales guy some days.

Michael Hurley:               
Yes.

Mike Kelly:                         
And I actually have a weird allergic reaction when I think of WarmUp because for me when I close a deal, it's weird for me to then think I just closed, Mike, now I'm going to ask him to refer me. I'm sure you hear this all the time, right?

Michael Hurley:               
Yup.

Mike Kelly:                         
Versus like, "Okay. I closed this account three months ago. We've been killing it and doing great work. Now I want to go ask this guy for a referral." Right?

Michael Hurley:               
Right.

Mike Kelly:                         
So like talk to a me a little bit about that. So for me as the sales guy, puts me back a little bit to think like, "Oh, I just closed a deal. I've never done anything for this person. Now I'm going to ask them to refer me." What's either wrong with my psychology or is that just the type of thing that I'm selling versus if I was selling something else? Like share that with me.

Michael Hurley:               
Yeah. So it's interesting, the sales process should be an educational process for your prospect, right? It should be a with most times and with certain products and services, it is a very educational process where you're essentially teaching them the differences between your services and your team, why they should work with you or spend money with you as opposed to another venue or another product or another service. You're doing something for them that is valuable in itself and hopefully they like and respect you at the end of the sales process.

Michael Hurley:               
Anytime that value is perceived or delivered I think is a great opportunity to ask for a referral. That's my own personal opinion. I think if you get to the end of the sales process, if they respect you and they like you and they feel like they've learned something from you, I think as a sales professional, you're well within your rights at that point to say, "Hey. Are you happy about this thing? Did you enjoy the sales process with me? Is there anybody else you know that might find what we do valuable or helpful to them?"

Michael Hurley:               
I guess when it comes down to it, there's a certain percentage of people that no matter how the sales process went, they're never going to feel comfortable making that referral. And that's okay. I will say this, the caveat is you shouldn't treat everybody the same, right? So certainly throughout the sales process, if you start to identify that this is the type of personality that wouldn't react well to that referral ask, don't make that referral ask. But I do think that there's a large percentage of the population that they want to help you at the end of the sales process. They've be willing to rather, but they have to be prompted, they have to be asked.

Michael Hurley:                I hope that makes some sense.

Mike Kelly:                         
Fantastically well answered. So let's pivot to competition. When you think of competitors for WarmUp, what comes to mind?

Michael Hurley:               
So there is a lot of competitors that focus on the lead side of things when it comes to relationships. There's a lot of products out there, companies like LinkedIn, right? Obviously a social network. There's Nudge, there's Alignable, there's a lot of products out there that are heavily focused on who are the relationships that your customers have and helping you identify those relationships so that you can ask our customers and your contacts for referrals to those people.

Michael Hurley:               
So the way that we kind of thought about the marketplace is. There's a lot of that stuff already out there. There's also a lot of email marketing platforms out there, right? And we don't want to get caught up in being confused with those organizations or those services. There are not a lot of sales enablement tools out there that helps sales reps understand how and when to ask for a referral. We really want to come in at the end of the sales cycle to help them ask for referrals at the end of the sales cycle, after they've either closed lost or closed won a deal, and help them for a habit around asking for a referral at that time with a process that we know works. And I think that that differentiates us, right? We don't want to be an email campaign platform. People start to ask us, "What makes you different than HubSpot or anyone of the other large platforms out there where you can easily do that thing?"

Michael Hurley:               
So speaking more broadly, there are a lot of different ways you can ask for referrals, right? You can do it via phone, you can do it via text, you can do it via email. One of the questions I get asked most often is, "Why wouldn't I just put together an email campaign and do this thing manually?" Right? I think if you have an existing customer base, you should do that thing. You should make sure you're asking all your customers for a referral at least once a year, right? But not everybody has a large existing customer base, and even if that's what you're going to do, people often aren't sure how to make that ask to their customer base. They're not sure when to do it, how to do it, and how to make it easy on their customers.

Michael Hurley:               
So one of the things I run into a lot is people say, "Well, why can't I just do this thing manually?" And then I will tackle in respect and turn that around and say, "Well, why aren't you doing it today?" Right? And then we kind of have a conversation around maybe what are the knowledge gaps they have or technology gaps or anything of that nature.

Mike Kelly:                         
You bootstrap your way to this point, correct?

Michael Hurley:               
We did. Yeah.

Mike Kelly:                         
So play out for me six months maybe. So let's go six-12 months into the future when you think of where this product is evolving to. So maybe 12-24 months is a better way, because by then you're rich because this things gone off a couple $100,000 in monthly recurring revenue. I just want to give you outside of present constraints. So let's go 12-24 months. 12-24 months in the future, when it's raining cash and you can make strategic product investments, where do you think you're making those investments on this platform? Is it AB testing on messaging, is it finding new places within a customer lifecycle to ask for a referral, is it different ways to engage a sales team? Like I'd love your thoughts on like when you have the capital to make more strategic investments, where do you think this process better?

Michael Hurley:               
I'm very interested in finding ways to make the whole process more effective for some of those people where the referrals more complicated or a little bit tougher. So if you have a smaller number of like large enterprise clients, if you have a client base where it's a very long sales cycle, and it's just a much more complicated sale, sometimes asking for referrals from them is more difficult. You may want to ask them to send a permission based sort of message to somebody in their network and that permission based message might say something to the effect of, "Hey, we've been working with WarmUp, and they've done great work for us over the last 12 months. Here's a case study. Here's a link to a video about them." Essentially how do we help arm people to make permission based referrals for some of these people who want referrals but it's a much more complicated ask versus what the ticket sales rep is doing for the baseball team.

Mike Kelly:                         
I love that. It's the number one way if I tell somebody I will give them a referral, is I then go ask permission first rather than just flood somebody's inbox with info.

Michael Hurley:               
Yeah. It's interesting. Like there's a time and a place for everything, right? So like what we're finding is there is a lot of companies where asking for an introduction at the end of the sales cycle in an automated sort of way, it works really well, and it just adds a whole other predictable stream of new deals to the pipeline. And there are other companies where it doesn't work quite as well because the ask needs to be more nuanced, like what you're talking about. So maybe the permission based email that you send out, sends this person that you're trying to refer to a landing page. Right? And then they can interact with something at that landing page. And then at that point, then it becomes a lead, right? And you can still count that as a referral. But it's different than the way it works for the ticket sales rep.

Michael Hurley:               
There's a lot of integrations and things like that from a technology standpoint that I think would be really interesting that if you understand some of the data around the people that you're asking for referrals, if you understand their personality and if you personalize things a little bit more, that could be helpful. There's just a lot of things out there that we could integrate into the platform. We haven't done a lot of those yet because I didn't feel like our customer base was big enough yet to really understand what is a common thread across all of them. And I didn't want to just build anything in.

Michael Hurley:               
We're kind of getting to the point now where I should probably stop implementing things that I think is a good idea, right? Now we've got people riding the bike. So I'm trying to pull them. For me, personally, it's kind of been a learning process to figure out how do I ask those questions in a way that gets the right kind of information out of them, right?

Mike Kelly:                         
If I can ask you a challenging question, what makes WarmUp its own standalone product and not just a feature of larger CRM system like Salesforce or HubSpot or something like that?

Michael Hurley:               
It's a great question. I don't think that the right answer is to talk about the kind of technology that we've made or built or will build. I think it's much more around understanding that asking for referrals is in and of itself its own outbound activity. So I'm encouraging folks to think about it as something similar to email outbound activity or making calls. Referrals needs to be treated as the third leg on the stool. There's a lot of nuances around how and when you should ask for referrals, understanding the process that should be used based on the company you work for and the industry that you operate in, and we're going to be able to build off of those nuances. We developed a lot of soft IP already around the industries that we're helping and the customers we're helping because everybody's process looks a little bit different, and we're starting to see some common threads in sports and entertainment and also in the software sector as well around how and when they ask for referrals. And so it's complicated enough and it's nuanced enough that as the third leg on that outbound activity stool, we believe we can build a standalone product that adds a lot of value and creates another predictable stream of revenue in a way that deserves to be its own thing.

Mike Kelly:                         
Do all of your customers use Salesforce? Do you have other customers with different CRM systems and/or customers without a CRM system?

Michael Hurley:               
We do. Early on, we took on a number of customers that did not use Salesforce, and for the most part, the majority of those customers are asking their existing customer base with WarmUp. So one of the things that I think I maybe mentioned earlier in the podcast but what we noticed early on is that people sometimes had hundreds of customers and they weren't asking them for referrals at all throughout the year, which we thought was unfortunate for them. So even though they weren't using Salesforce, even though we couldn't help them automatically ask at the end of every sales cycle, we could help them export their existing list of customers and load those in, and make sure that they were asking them once year. So there's a lot of people using the platform today that don't use Salesforce. We feel like we're adding a good amount of value for them because if you have ... Like we have one higher education customer that they had 100 customers. They used WarmUp to ask them for referrals. They generated 30 referrals, which is great for them.

Mike Kelly:                         
That's great.

Michael Hurley:               
I mean, they had a really long sales cycle that lasted 12 to 16 months. So for them, they had a really hard time filling the top of the funnel. So that's a common thread across most of our customers is that they have pain filling the top of the funnel. Sometimes they are operating in a niche industry or just there's some constraints there either geographically or because of their product and service. And so we feel like we can add value for people even if they're not using sales force.

Mike Kelly:                         
And when you think of WarmUp as a product that you're taking to market, do you think of yourself as building a sales lead organization or a marketing lead organization? Meaning do you think you're going to get most of your customers by you picking up the phone or a sales team, which right now is you, picking up the phone and talking to people, or do you think it's I'm finding your product. I'm going to your website. I'm clicking sign up, entering credit card, and going.

Michael Hurley:               
Because I've been in sales my whole career, I'm going to go with what I know to get started, right? So we're certainly going to have a heavy focus on outbound here over the next year, and I think we always will, right? Because we always want to eat our own cooking. And so well over half of our own deals have come from referrals. Well over half of our opportunities in the pipeline have come from referrals. We'll continue to heavily focus on outbound because it's me doing sales for the foreseeable future. But I've been very pleasantly surprised by the ability for us to generate inbound leads. So every month I try to do at least two marketing activities, whether that's a guest blog post or it's a podcast or a video interview or something fun like that. Every month for the last six months, we've generated a couple of inbound leads, which I made the marketing website and I'm a sales guy so if that tells you anything. I'm really proud of the fact that we've been able to generate a couple of inbound leads. I would love to see the cost of customer acquisition decrease, right? By focusing more on marketing. So we're very interested in trying to figure out what that looks like. I would love to have a version of the product that people can onboard themselves onto, right?

Michael Hurley:               
Today, there's a sales touch. There's an onboarding touch.

Mike Kelly:                         
That's super common for an early stage company. Don't feel bad about that.

Mike Kelly:                         
We actually talk about that as a strategy, and part of it goes back to what you said. You just got customers on the bicycle. You want to see how they ride. If somebody is self servicing, you can't see that. Right?

Michael Hurley:               
Yep.

Mike Kelly:                         
So you're ability to help somebody onboard, ask them a bunch of questions, see their data, you're looking through that process as well. How many times do you need to talk to a customer when you say, "Hey, give me your list of past customers," and they look at you and say, "What? What list? Do you have companies that keep that in a list somewhere?" It's like, "Okay, Chuck. We need a different self onboarding process." You know what I mean? You just learn so much about process that ...

Michael Hurley:               
Right.

Mike Kelly:                         
So I think that's a great strategy for anybody getting started, even if you could have somebody self service in many B2B contacts, I think that can sometimes be a mistake because you're making a bunch of assumptions about who your customer is and that process that may or may not be true.

Michael Hurley:               
Yeah. It's so easy to make assumptions and that's a very dangerous thing to do.

Mike Kelly:                         
All right. So when you're selling in the market, how often are you selling against another solution, and I know you said you have people who are like, "Hey, I can do this myself," and then you steer the conversation to why aren't you. But like are you ever coming up against a Nudge or some other product our there or is it just an education on, "Hey, man. You should be doing referrals. We can help you do that," and they're not looking at other tools?

Michael Hurley:               
I'm often not running into competitors. So I go back and forth between feeling like that's a bad thing and thinking it's a good thing. So I often don't run into competitors. When I talk to sales teams, whether it's a baseball team, a professional sports organization, or it's a software product company on the West Coast that's growing like gang busters, the most ... I rarely run into anybody who says, "Oh, we already ask for referrals at the end of every sales cycle," or, "We already ask our customer base for referrals." The bottom line is I think that they ... It's not ... This is going to sound bad on the surface, but they don't think of it as a priority right off the bat.

Michael Hurley:               
So it's kind of through the sales cycle that they often realize that they're leaving a lot of revenue on the table. And they also slowly open up to me that they're seeing a lot of activity but not a lot of effective activity on the sales side or they're not making enough revenue fast enough, right? So they start to understand that this is a thing we're not doing. It rolls up into one of our most important initiatives or one of our most critical pain points today, and maybe it's a great way to actually address the problem. I actually had a conversation last week that I thought was wonderful because I asked the VP of sales to go look at all the deals they closed last year and tell me where those deals came from. And they discovered that their largest deal of the year actually came through a referral, which for them kind of helps validate and give them some evidence that this ...

Mike Kelly:                         
Good activity.

Michael Hurley:               
This is a good activity. It does work. We should do more of it. And then it just becomes about, "Okay. Well, if we want to do more of it, how do we do more of it? And how do I hold my team accountable to do more of it?"

Mike Kelly: 
All right, man. If people want to learn more about WarmUp or if they want to get in touch with you directly, how do they do that?

Michael Hurley: 
Feel free to email me. It's just mike@sendwarmup.com or you can go to our website sendwarmup.com. There's an opportunity on the site to request a demo. Happy to set up a time to do that with folks and talk with you more about how we can help you.

Mike Kelly:
Thanks, man.

Michael Hurley:                Thanks.